Schedule

Prior Sessions

2010-2019 SE University Core Sessions

2019 SE University Schedule
2018 SE University Schedule        2017 SE University Schedule        2016 SE University Schedule
2015 SE University Schedule       2014 SE University Schedule       2013 SE University Schedule 
2012 SE University Schedule       2011 SE University Schedule       2010 SE University Schedule

In addition to the yearly schedules above, you can also access the past session information by CATEGORY or DATE. If you are an SE University Client and would like to watch previous sessions, please log in to your SEU Resource Center account, and select the SEU Session Library.


Upcoming SE University Sessions

SE University Core sessions are held the 2nd Wednesday of each month. Supplemental sessions are provided as noted. All times shown are Eastern time.

Apr
8
Wed
Masonry Checklist: Reviewing Structural Drawings
Apr 8 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Speaker: Sam Rubenzer, PE, SE
FORSE Consulting

Checklists are helpful for structural engineers to ensure that all design considerations are met. This SE University session will focus on developing a checklist for masonry design. Among the considerations that will go into the makeup of the checklist are ensuring that the designs be: optimal and efficient, safe and reliable, and constructible. As the checklist is developed, each item from the checklist will be supported by current industry standards, including TMS 402/602-16, and NCMA TEK Guides 10-2D and 10-3.
Learning Objectives:
  • Develop checklist of important items for masonry design and construction.
  • Review important aspect of masonry design criteria.
  • Discuss best practices for element design.
  • Consider the impact of efficient and effective designs in case studies.

 

Handout and registration emails for this session will be sent to SE University companies on Friday, April 3rd.

Apr
17
Fri
SEU BIM Forum: Town Hall with Betsy Werra
Apr 17 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Speaker: Betsy Werra
E.L.Werra Consulting

This SEU BIM Forum Town Hall session will address various questions asked by SE University Clients. Previously submitted questions have been reviewed, and we will ask one of the questions, provide an answer, and follow up on any questions related to that topic before moving on to the next question.

Note: a PDH Certificate will NOT be provided for this session. 

Questions submitted for this session

(to be answered in this order; after 1 hour, we will “carry over” the remaining questions to the next session)

  1. What the best way to frame sloped structural framing members?
  2. What is the best method to model sloping roof steel?
  3. For framing plans: How do you show building openings (such as doors, windows, etc) while also showing the framing/header above?
  4. Is it possible to edit system families (ex. section flag)?
  5. Copy/Monitor tool – How useful is that? Is it commonly used and how does it work?
  6. What are your thoughts on the effectiveness and limitations of the copy/monitor tool for walls?
  7. Design Options relating to structures still confuses some of us. Anything to help clarify this feature.
  8. Can you please explain the View Range feature in detail, (especially the Top Range)?
  9. Is it possible to put a referenced callout into a larger text note? Example being “See #5/S3.2 for additional information – Typical this elevation”. So instead of having to manually fill in the #5/S3.2 can that be referenced text, so if/when the detail moves the number updates automatically.
  10. Do you anticipate Revit allowing for an alternate dimension string for existing conditions? It would be useful to be able to put in ± as a prefix and (F.V.) without using the override with adding a prefix and suffix for every dimension string.
May
1
Fri
SEU BIM Forum: Town Hall #2 with Betsy Werra
May 1 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Speaker: Betsy Werra
E.L.Werra Consulting

This SEU BIM Forum Town Hall session will address various questions asked by SE University Clients. Previously submitted questions have been reviewed, and we will ask one of the questions, provide an answer, and follow up on any questions related to that topic before moving on to the next question.

Note: a PDH Certificate will NOT be provided for this session. 

Questions submitted for this session
(to be answered in this order; after 1 hour, we will “carry over” the remaining questions to the next session)
Please note that the question numbers are a continuation from the previous Town Hall Session on 4/17.

  1. Is it possible to put a referenced callout into a larger text note? Example being “See #5/S3.2 for additional information – Typical this elevation”. So instead of having to manually fill in the #5/S3.2 can that be referenced text, so if/when the detail moves the number updates automatically.
  2. Do you anticipate Revit allowing for an alternate dimension string for existing conditions? It would be useful to be able to put in ± as a prefix and (F.V.) without using the override with adding a prefix and suffix for every dimension string.
  3. Can you describe your folder structure and process for maintaining your custom Revit library.
    Do you update your families to the newer versions with every new release? Do you update your company template with the new families at every new release?
    Does your company template “lag” the current release just in case new projects still start using older versions of Revit?
  4. What do you do when you have to “save” to a previous version? We have had projects at the same facility with different clients. Sometimes the second project is done in an older version of REVIT, so we either have to dumb it down to an IFC, try to do some fancy Dynamo scripts to save the model and reproduce it in an older version, or remodel the information. Unfortunately, we cannot mandate the version of Revit our client uses.
  5. What is the best (most efficient) way of using a shared architectural model in creating the structural model/documents; i.e. redrawing walls, floors, roof decks or using the architect’s model? We want our drawings to look a certain way, but often find we need to remodel what the architect has to get the look we want.
  6. Is there a way to control the hatching of different layers of walls from an architect’s shared model? We want the veneer to show hatched but the rest of the wall layers to be shown in coarse mode.
  7. We want to show our window openings hatched. Is there a way without just drawing a hatch in each location on plan?
  8. Can you clarify an issue with materials – why are some listed by category, some are not, and what is the best workflow.
  9. What would be a step by step systematic process to associate a specific project elevation with a specific Mean Sea Level (MSL) elevation (particularly if the MSL elevation isn’t made available until late in the project)? For example Project elevation +(100’-0”) = 831.44 MSL.
  10. What are the pros and cons of modeling rebar in concrete elements – would be good to see some examples. We don’t model these elements and detail everything on sections with components/detail lines.
  11. Can you discuss steel connections to be modeled and scheduled and the pros and cons of this action. We use drafting lines to detail them but would be nice to see some examples of modeling those elements.
May
13
Wed
Practical Strategies for the Modeling and Analysis of Diaphragms
May 13 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Speaker: Allen Adams, P.E., S.E.
Bentley Systems, Inc. / RAM

Session Description:

The behavior of a building structure in response to an earthquake or wind, including the distribution of the lateral forces to the lateral force resisting elements such as moment frames, braced frames or shear walls, is heavily dependent upon the nature, extent and stiffness of the floor and roof diaphragms. It is important that the building model used in the analysis and design of a building accurately – or adequately – captures the effects of these diaphragms.

ASCE 7 has fairly extensive requirements related to diaphragms, but confidently determining the proper way of performing the necessary analyses that satisfy those requirements can be challenging. With an emphasis on semi-rigid diaphragms, this presentation will discuss the types of diaphragms identified by the Building Codes and commonly considered by engineers, review Building Code requirements pertaining to those diaphragms, and provide practical recommendations on the appropriate modeling of those diaphragms in analysis software.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the differences between rigid, semi-rigid, and flexible diaphragms and their impacts on analytical results
  • Review in-depth the 2018 IBC and ASCE 7-16 building code requirements pertaining to diaphragms
  • Learn about the sensitivity of analytical results to the various components of semi-rigid diaphragm model, including mesh size, material stiffness, and frame stiffness
  • Make appropriate decisions on diaphragm and load modeling, balancing the needed level of accuracy with the business demands of speed and simplicity

 

Handout and registration emails for this session will be sent to SE University companies on Friday, May 8th.

May
27
Wed
SEU BIM Forum: Tips & Tricks in Revit Structure – Truss Options within Revit Structure
May 27 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Speaker: Betsy Werra
E.L.Werra Consulting

 

This SEU BIM Forum session will demonstrate various ways to create different types of parametric trusses using the Revit family templates and in-place families to make them work for your building design.

 

The webinar will show various Truss tools for attaching, editing profiles, cutback and resetting the truss, and exploding the truss to individual components.   This session will delve deep into the family editor for truss creation so it will be important for attendees to have some knowledge about families such as reference planes, reference lines, formulas, form creation, and the creation of parameters.

 

Learning Objectives:

Recognize the different types of Truss families.

Understand how to edit a truss by using Truss tools, family editor and modification options.

Identify how to create trusses using Truss templates and families, In-Place families, and framing elements.

 

Handout and registration emails for this session will be sent to SE University companies on Friday, May 22nd.

 

Jun
10
Wed
Steel Framed Floor Design for Vibration-Sensitive Equipment
Jun 10 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Speaker: Brad Davis, PhD, SE, PE
Davis Structural Engineering, LLC

This SEU session will cover vibration serviceability of floors that support sensitive equipment such as microscopes and magnetic resonance imagers. Tolerance limits for sensitive equipment are stringent and come in various forms, so these will be discussed in some detail. Prerequisite vibration theory will be covered, followed by a discussion of The American Institute of Steel Construction Design Guide 11 Chapter 6 methodology and experimental backing. Finally, a detailed example will be presented.
Learning Objectives
By participating in this session, viewers will be able to:
Describe the response metrics used to characterize floor vibrations for sensitive equipment applications.
Describe the various forms of tolerance limits for sensitive equipment.
Apply the vibration evaluation methodology in Chapter 6 of the AISC Design Guide 11

Handout and registration emails for this session will be sent to SE University companies on Friday, June 5th.

Jul
8
Wed
What Your Fabricator Wishes You Knew About HSS
Jul 8 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Speaker: Kim Olson, PE
Steel Tube Institute

There is a common misconception that structures using hollow structural sections (HSS) are more expensive than those comprised primarily of open sections.   The truth of the matter is that it is in the fabrication of HSS where costs can creep up, far more than the cost of the actual steel itself. So proper HSS member design and connections have a significant influence on the total fabricated cost of a structure. The Steel Tube Institute (STI) went directly to fabricators to learn how to reduce the costs of HSS fabrication and connections. This presentation is designed to share those insights, helping engineers learn what fabricators wish they knew about HSS.

Handout and registration emails for this session will be sent to SE University companies on Monday, July 6th (due to the July 4th holiday).

 

 

Aug
12
Wed
Seven Deadly Email Sins
Aug 12 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Speaker: Jamie Piercy
PCIA

Emails are part of the oxygen of our daily professional lives. They are a primary path of communication and we use them to get things done. Yet, given the litigious nature of our world, it is critical to treat this common form of communication with the attention it needs, and think very carefully about what we write and why we write it. This SE University session will present examples of self-implicating and subsequently weaponized emails and guidelines for writing appropriate, shorter, clearer messages.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the best practices for writing well-crafted emails that are clear, concise, and actionable
  • Examine and edit cited emails, identifying inappropriate text and discussing alternative language or alternative methods of communication
  • Recognize and comprehend email communication that could create a misunderstanding, exacerbate an issue, or implicate the sender in a claim
  • Use litmus test questions to evaluate emails before sending them; and to assess the need to send or further revise an email message with additional recommended preemptive actions

 

Handout and Registration emails for this session will be sent to SE University companies on Friday, August 7th.

Aug
26
Wed
SEU BIM Forum: Tips & Tricks in Revit Structure – Beams And Braces in Revit Structure
Aug 26 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Speaker: Betsy Werra
E.L.Werra Consulting

This SEU BIM Forum session will demonstrate various ways to create and add different types of parametric beams and braces using the structural framing families. During the session, Betsy Werra will show the beam, beam system, and brace tools for placing these types of elements. She will cover editing profiles, updating parametric properties, and changing symbolic representation for structural framing elements, as well as displaying various information for all beam/brace framing tags. This session will delve deep into the family editor for customizing structural framing families, so it will be important for attendees to have some knowledge about families such as reference planes, reference lines, formulas, form creation, and the creation of parameters.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize the difference between adding a beam and a brace element to a Revit model.
  • Understand how to edit/change structural framing members by using the beam/brace properties, family editor and modification options.
  • Identify how to display the symbolic representation and tag information for beams and braces.

 

Handout and registration emails for this session will be sent to SE University companies on Friday, August 21st.

Sep
9
Wed
Concrete Mix Design
Sep 9 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Speaker: Otto Schwarz, PE, SE
Ryan Biggs | Clark Davis

Handout and registration emails for this session will be sent to SE University companies on Friday, September 4th.

Session Description:

Concrete Mix Design for the Practicing Engineer provides a general overview of the basics of concrete hydration, and the parameters of concrete mix design effecting durability, strength, serviceability, and workability. The ACI 318 and 301 code requirements for concrete mix strength verification and durability are then reviewed as they relate to the various concrete mix components.  This information is then combined to provide qualitative predictive tools and “Rules of Thumb” for review of concrete mix designs and estimation of concrete material strength and durability.

Learning Objectives:

Upon attending this session, viewers will be able to:
  • Understand the composition and curing of structural concrete (qualitatively).
  • Learn the function and roles of pozzolans / supplementary cementitious materials, as well as admixtures.
  • Learn what to look for in a Concrete Mix Design Review.
  • Qualitatively predict the relative behavior of a concrete mix design.