Useful Resources for Masonry Joint Design

To access the articles from the July 2017 Learn, Innovate Excel Newsletter, please use the links below:

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE? OMF VS IMF VS SMF

NEW DESIGN APPROACH RECOMMENDED FOR CHEVRON BRACED FRAMES

Are you aware of the many resources that are available for free to assist structural engineers in the design and detailing of masonry?  Sometimes, engineers are so busy meeting deadlines that they don’t have the time to peruse the many resources that could save time and reduce errors, especially when detailing masonry movement joints.

In the March 2017 SE University Core Session, Masonry Movement Joints from a Structural and Architectural Perspective, Sam Rubenzer, PE, SE, from FORSE Consulting and Pat Conway, AIA, from the International Masonry Institute reviewed a variety of topics as they pertain to structural and architectural veneer masonry movement joints.

Sam and Pat referenced many resources that can be useful when designing masonry movement joints.  These are great resources to refer back to when you may be using a new detail in your masonry designs, or need additional guidance for how to properly allow for masonry control joints to work as intended.

The first resource is through the International Masonry Institute at imiweb.org.  The IMI website provides the Masonry Detailing Series (MDS) which is an exhaustive collection of illustrative construction details and diagrams produced by International Masonry Institute (IMI) for architects and engineers to use as a design resource.  This compilation includes hundreds of details for brick, block, and stone masonry systems, as well as details for ceramic tile, marble, terrazzo, plaster, rain screen systems, terra cotta, AAC, and masonry restoration.

Additionally, the TEK guides and additional details that Sam and Pat referenced during this session are available through the National Concrete Masonry Association.  Click here to access NCMA’s website and click on the link at the top of the page to access either the TEK guides or Details as needed.  These online databases can help guide engineers when using materials that are unfamiliar, or when new situations are encountered during design.

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